Alumni

Ngamlamai Peailueang

Country: Thailand
Thesis Title: ADAPTATION OF FERTILITY BEHAVIOR AMONG IMMIGRANT WOMEN IN KANCHANABURI PROVINCE,THAILAND.
Advisor: VARACHAI THONGTHAI
Abstract:

The objectives of this study are to: 1) describe the fertility patterns of immigrants from Myanmar 2) study fertility behavior differences between Thai natives and immigrants, and 3) determine the pattern of fertility adaptation among immigrants. The data come from three sources: the survey of Kanchanaburi project, including both the first and second rounds (2000 and 2001), conducted by the Institute for Population and Social Research, Mahidol University, Thailand, and an additional module added to the primary survey for the specific purpose of obtaining extra information on the migration history of respondents. Women of reproductive age (15-49) who were living in selected areas of Kanchanaburi province were interviewed about their childbearing and migration history. The women were categorized into two groups: natives (2676) and immigrants (678). Human behavior and social environment theories from sociological and psychological perspectives related to migrant fertility adjustment in the migration process are applied in the study. The fertility behavior of natives and immigrants are described using various indicators, including the total fertility rate (TFR), age specific fertility rate (ASFR), age at first marriage, age at first birth, parity progression ratio (PPR), contraceptive use, additional children intended, and unmet need. Fertility adaptation is conceptualized as one of three patterns: fertility assimilation, fertility disruption, and fertility biculturalism. The specification of pattern is investigated through evidence related to changing parity progression. The hypothesis is that “fertility behavior among immigrants will adapt to native fertility through an assimilation process”. The results show that the ASFR in every age group of immigrants is significantly higher than that of natives. The TFR is estimated as 1.65 for natives and 3.19 for immigrants. The descriptions of fertility behavior confirm the fertility difference. Immigrant women marry at younger ages than do natives; however, natives tend to have first births closer to marriage than do immigrants. The PPR for cohort 45-49 of immigrants is consistency higher than that of natives. Contraceptive prevalence for overall methods is lower for immigrant women than for natives. Immigrants are more likely to intend to have more children than are natives. Immigrants show a small percentage of unmet need for contraception. Overall, natives tend to limit their family size to two children while immigrants desire larger families. Event History Analysis is used to estimate multivariate life tables of births during three ten-year periods. The assimilation hypothesis is rejected. Immigrants do not show any fertility adaptation pattern related to time spent in Thailand. However, there is some evidence of a bicultural pattern of fertility.

Alumni

Doctor of Philosophy in Demography (International Program)
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